How to wear a suit in summer

Our guide to wearing a suit in summer

The Fibre

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In winter, a suit is a stylish armour that brings a welcome warmth to help combat the elements. But come the humidity of summer, the thought of the additional layering a suit brings can seem too onerous. Thankfully, there are ways to cheat the heat and remain cool during the warmer months of the year.

Trans-seasonal fabrics

There is a school of thought that, come summer, you should ditch wool suits in favour of linen or cotton. Both are great fabrics, of course, but they lack the resilience (linen crinkles easily, while cotton shows signs of age) of wool.

In fact, wool is still the best fabric choice for suits, even when the mercury begins to rise. Because it is a natural fibre, wool breathes and can help keep you cool in the warmer months.

Merino Cool Wool is an ultra fine, lightweight wool designed specifically to be worn all year round, and its fibres are more than three times finer than the average human hair. Specifically chosen for it’s incredible breathability, Merino wool has the unique ability to keep the wearer warm in cooler months yet remain fresh in even the hottest climates.

The inside truth

Much of the heat production and retention of a suit actually occurs with its internal structure, such as the lining and shoulder pads. In warmer climates it’s rare to need a fully lined suit. Instead, a half-lined suit is a good compromise in creating an all-year-round garment.

In some cases, and it is the skill of your tailor that should dictate this, doing away with shoulder pads can also help reduce warmth. While this might seem anathema to tradition, it can also create a pleasing unstructured look – a great stylish touch for summer.

The styling details

Personal style notes can also make all the difference. Switching the brogues for a pair of sharp, polished loafers and doing away with the socks will add a European aesthetic to your look.

If office codes allow, eschewing a tie in favour for a pocket square and sporting an open collar shirt will allow excess body heat to escape.

If all else fails, wearing an undershirt – despite sounding counterintuitive – will absorb sweat off the body and prevent sweat stains from appearing on your shirt.

 

[Top Photo] Credit: Liz Ham

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